Temporal relations between magnetic bright points and the solar sunspot cycle

DOI: 
10.1093/pasj/psx115
Publication date: 
01/12/2017
Main author: 
Utz, Dominik
IAA authors: 
Utz, Dominik
Authors: 
Utz, Dominik;Muller, Richard;Van Doorsselaere, Tom
Journal: 
Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan
Refereed: 
Yes
Publication type: 
Article
Volume: 
69
Pages: 
98
Abstract: 
The Sun shows a global magnetic field cycle traditionally best visible in the photosphere as a changing sunspot cycle featuring roughly an 11-year period. In addition we know that our host star also harbours small-scale magnetic fields often seen as strong concentrations of magnetic flux reaching kG field strengths. These features are situated in inter-granular lanes, where they show up bright as so-called magnetic bright points (MBPs). In this short paper we wish to analyse an homogenous, nearly 10-year-long synoptic Hinode image data set recorded from 2006 November up to 2016 February in the G-band to inspect the relationship between the number of MBPs at the solar disc centre and the relative sunspot number. Our findings suggest that the number of MBPs at the solar disc centre is indeed correlated to the relative sunspot number, but with the particular feature of showing two different temporal shifts between the decreasing phase of cycle 23 including the minimum and the increasing phase of cycle 24 including the maximum. While the former is shifted by about 22 months, the latter is only shifted by less than 12 months. Moreover, we introduce and discuss an analytical model to predict the number of MBPs at the solar disc centre purely depending on the evolution of the relative sunspot number as well as the temporal change of the relative sunspot number and two background parameters describing a possibly acting surface dynamo as well as the strength of the magnetic field diffusion. Finally, we are able to confirm the plausibility of the temporal shifts by a simplistic random walk model. The main conclusion to be drawn from this work is that the injection of magnetic flux, coming from active regions as represented by sunspots, happens on faster time scales than the removal of small-scale magnetic flux elements later on.
Database: 
ADS
URL: 
https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/#abs/2017PASJ...69...98U/abstract
ADS Bibcode: 
2017PASJ...69...98U
Keywords: 
dynamo;Sun: activity;Sun: magnetic fields;sunspots;techniques: high angular resolution;Astrophysics - Solar and Stellar Astrophysics