Three-dimensional structure of a sunspot light bridge

DOI: 
10.1051/0004-6361/201629586
Publication date: 
01/11/2016
Main author: 
Felipe, T.
IAA authors: 
Orozco Suárez, D.
Authors: 
Felipe, T.;Collados, M.;Khomenko, E.;Kuckein, C.;Asensio Ramos, A.;Balthasar, H.;Berkefeld, T.;Denker, C.;Feller, A.;Franz, M.;Hofmann, A.;Joshi, J.;Kiess, C.;Lagg, A.;Nicklas, H.;Orozco Suárez, D.;Pastor Yabar, A.;Rezaei, R.;Schlichenmaier, R.;Schmidt, D.;Schmidt, W.;Sigwarth, M.;Sobotka, M.;Solanki, S. K.;Soltau, D.;Staude, J.;Strassmeier, K. G.;Volkmer, R.;von der Lühe, O.;Waldmann, T.
Journal: 
Astronomy and Astrophysics
Refereed: 
Yes
Publication type: 
Article
Volume: 
596
Pages: 
A59
Abstract: 
Context. Active regions are the most prominent manifestations of solar magnetic fields; their generation and dissipation are fundamental problems in solar physics. Light bridges are commonly present during sunspot decay, but a comprehensive picture of their role in the removal of the photospheric magnetic field is still lacking. <BR /> Aims: We study the three-dimensional configuration of a sunspot, and in particular, its light bridge, during one of the last stages of its decay. <BR /> Methods: We present the magnetic and thermodynamical stratification inferred from full Stokes inversions of the photospheric Si i 10 827 Å and Ca i 10 839 Å lines obtained with the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph of the GREGOR telescope at the Observatorio del Teide, Tenerife, Spain. The analysis is complemented by a study of continuum images covering the disk passage of the active region, which are provided by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. <BR /> Results: The sunspot shows a light bridge with penumbral continuum intensity that separates the central umbra from a smaller umbra. We find that in this region the magnetic field lines form a canopy with lower magnetic field strength in the inner part. The photospheric light bridge is dominated by gas pressure (high-β), as opposed to the surrounding umbra, where the magnetic pressure is higher. A convective flow is observed in the light bridge. This flow is able to bend the magnetic field lines and to produce field reversals. The field lines merge above the light bridge and become as vertical and strong as in the surrounding umbra. We conclude that this occurs because two highly magnetized regions approach each other during the sunspot evolution.Movies associated to Figs. 2 and 13 are available at <A href='http://www.aanda.org'>http://www.aanda.org</A>
Database: 
ADS
SCOPUS
URL: 
https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/#abs/2016A&A...596A..59F/abstract
ADS Bibcode: 
2016A&A...596A..59F
Keywords: 
Sun: photosphere;Sun: magnetic fields;sunspots;methods: data analysis;methods: observational;Sun: activity;Astrophysics - Solar and Stellar Astrophysics